Brenda Beckman-Long, PhD

Assistant Professor of English Faculty of Arts and Science

Education

She has a doctorate in English from the University of Alberta and post doctorate from McMaster University

Specialization

She teaches and researches in the areas of Canadian literature, Canadian women’s writing, autobiography theory, testimony and trauma studies.

Biography

Brenda Beckman-Long teaches English at Briercrest College and Seminary. She has a doctorate in English from the University of Alberta and post doctorate from McMaster University. She teaches and researches in the areas of Canadian literature, Canadian women's writing, autobiography theory, testimony and trauma studies.

Research

Published articles and essays on confession, autobiography, and women's writing appear in Studies in Canadian Literature, English Studies in Canada, Literature and Theology, Tessera, Challenging Territory: The Writing of Margaret Laurence (ed. Christian Riegel, 1997), Dictionary of Literary Biography: 21st-century Canadian Writers (ed. Christian Riegel, 2007), West of Eden: Essays on Canadian Prairie Literature (ed. Sue Sorensen, 2009), and Mind the Gap: Saskatchewan Cultural Spaces (eds. Christine Ramsay and Randal Rogers, 2014). She belongs to the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) and theCRC Symposium for Diversity in Canadian Literary Cultures, a community of scholars formed around the Canada Research Chair in Diversity in Canadian Literary Cultures at McMaster University.

Publications

Her forthcoming book, Carol Shields and The Writer-Critic (UTP), is a critical reappraisal of Shields's work and career as a novelist.

Her most recent work (in progress) explores how 21st-century Canadian novelists engage readers in historical and current crises through testimonial narratives. She examines texts that bear witness to far-reaching traumas on a world stage: Karen Connelly's The Lizard Cage, Lawrence Hill's The Book of Negroes, Steven Galloway's The Cellist of Sarajevo, and Anne Michaels's Fugitive Pieces. Together these novels bridge gaps of space and time, coveringAsia,Europe,Africa, theU.S. andCanada from 1800 to 2001. They inscribe the reader as a witness by employing autobiographical genres, crossing boundaries between fiction and nonfiction, and blending first- and third-person or multiple perspectives. They thereby create ethical communities of readers and new international audiences.