College Courses

 

Philosophy

PHI 100 Introduction to Philosophy I (3)

A study of the history, methods, and assumptions of the classical philosophical systems with special attention given to epistemology and metaphysics. The course emphasizes critical thinking and the development of understanding through reasoned argument.

PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy II (3)

A continued study of the foundations established in PHI 100 Introduction to Philosophy I with special consideration given to philosophy of religion, ethics, and social philosophy. Emphasis is again placed on the development of critical thinking skills.

PHI 105 Critical Thinking (3)

An analysis of basic types of reasoning, argument types, common fallacies, and problems of clarity and meaning. Particular attention is paid to the critical assessment of information, current beliefs, and conventions.

PHI 300 Philosophy of Education (3)

This course provides a philosophical analysis of classic, modern, analytic, and post-analytic theories of education. Major theorists studied include Plato, Aristotle, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, Whitehead, Dewey, Hirst, Peters, and Rorty. Particular attention is paid to varying conceptions of the nature, scope, purpose, and social implications of education. Each student participates in a semester-long project involving philosophical research, writing, peer review, and public defense.

Cross-listed: EDUC 310 Philosophy of Education

Prerequisite(s): PHI 100 Introduction to Philosophy I

PHI 310 Early Medieval Philosophy: Boethius to Abelard (3)

Early Medieval Philosophy consists of philosophical works written between the 4th and the early 12th centuries CE. Writers studied may include Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Psuedo-Dionysius, and Peter Abelard. Topics to be studied may include the existence of God, the nature of God, free will, intellectual and moral virtues, and the relation between reason and revelation.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 313 Early Modern Philosophy (3)

A critical survey of major seventeenth- and eighteenth-century empiricist and rationalist philosophers including Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.

Prerequisite(s): PHI100 Introduction to Philosophy I

PHI 314 Nineteenth-Century Philosophy (3)

A critical survey of the major European philosophers of the nineteenth century including Hegel, Schopenhauer, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Mill, and Marx.

Prerequisite(s): PHI 100 Introduction to Philosophy

PHI 336 Contemporary Epistemology (3)

The course will be an exploration of some of the current issues in Western epistemology. Students will be introduced to some of the recent problems, positions, and philosophers especially in relation to the Social Sciences and Education. There will be interaction with both Anglo-American and Continental Philosophers such as Searle, Gadamer, Habermas, Rorty, and Plantinga.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 340 Philosophy of Technology (3)

An examination of the nature of human consciousness in its relation to technology in order to better understand the effect that the discourses of efficiency and technical rationality have on human freedom, on ethical awareness, and on justice within society.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 380 War, Peace, and Society (3)

An analysis of the ethical issues connected with war, peace, and revolution. These topics will be critically examined with attention to broader socio-political movements such as imperialism, the Crusades, colonialism, and the modern nation-state, and to moral theories such as pacifism, holy war, just war, and deterrence.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 387 Social and Political Philosophy (3)

This course critically analyzes and evaluates philosophical theories of political and social organization. Attention is given to primary source documents and to the social and intellectual milieu surrounding these classic theories. Authors studied include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Machievelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx.

Prerequisite(s): PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy II

PHI 393 Specialized Study (3)

Offered occasionally to provide in-depth study in a topic in Philosophy that is not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 420 Existentialism (3)

A seminar examining the philosophical and literary movement known as existentialism, with its characteristic emphasis upon the human condition. Writers studied may include Pascal, Dostoyevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Kafka, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, and Beauvoir.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 455 Philosophy of Religion (3)

An exploration of philosophical concerns arising out of theism in general and Christian theism in particular. The topics in this course are designed to complement those covered in PHI 101 Introduction to Philosophy II. Topics include faith and reason, the divine attributes, religious language, life after death, religious diversity, and the philosophical analysis of theological doctrines.

Cross-listed: RLST 455 Philosophy of Religion

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 470 Studies in the History of Philosophy (3)

A seminar in the thought of a particular philosopher or movement. Course emphasizes careful reading and detailed analysis of primary sources.

Prerequisite(s): 6 credit hours of Philosophy

PHI 493 Specialized Study (3)

A seminar offered occasionally to provide in-depth study in a topic in Philosophy that is not covered in regularly scheduled courses.

Prerequisite(s): credit hours of Philosophy and the completion of 75 credit hours of coursework